Archive for Presentations, Conference

"Multimodal Composition Practices: Overviews and Impacts on Tenure & Promotion"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, July). Multimodal composition practices: Overviews and impacts on tenure & promotion. Virtual Reality & Real Life (VR@RL) Conference [Online].

abstract
In this online asynchronous session, I presented results and discussion from the CCCC Survey on multimodal practices, with particular emphasis on the section about tenure and promotion issues for scholars working in digital media.

accompanying materials

"Editing Scholarship in a New Media Age"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, May 27). Editing scholarship in a new media age. Computers & Writing, Lubbock, TX.

abstract
In this panel presentation, four presenters (editors of Kairos or authors for Kairos’s 10th anniversary issue) discuss the history and trajectory of digital writing studies’ longest-running online journal. I focused on the transitions the journal underwent as it progressed into its 11th year of publication.

accompanying materials

  • none

"A Survey of Multimodal Composition Practices"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, May 26). A survey of multimodal composition practices: Report on a CCCC Research Initiative Grant. Computers & Writing, Lubbock, TX.

abstract
In this panel presentation, the six investigators of the CCCC Research Initiative Grant on multimodal pedagogies presented the findings of the survey results. I focused on the survey section about demographics and tenure and promotion practices for digital media scholarship.

accompanying materials

  • once there was an outline…

see also

"First Year Out: Time- and Face-Management Tips for Junior Faculty Members"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, May 26). First year out: Time- and face-management tips for junior faculty members. Computers & Writing, Lubbock, TX.

abstract
In this session, several newly hired tenure-track faculty members present advice, suggestions, and tips for managing the transition to their schools. I focused on how to balance professional and personal roles through time-management practices and on how to make sure your new colleagues get to know you, through what I called “face-management” practices.

accompanying materials

  • not available

see also

"Revisiting the Usefulness of Current Multimodal and New Media Theories"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, March 23). Revisiting the usefulness of current multimodal and new media theories. Conference on College Composition & Communication, Chicago, IL.

abstract
In this presentation, I discussed two sets of rubrics posited by new media scholars, Gunther Kress and Theo van Leeuwen in their book Multimodal Discourse and Lev Manovich in his book A Language of New Media. I argue that these rubrics are only so useful for rhetoric and composition scholars because they don’t focus on rhetorical ways of understanding digital media texts.

accompanying materials

  • website to come

see also

"Designing Educational Spaces for Students & Colleagues"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2005, October 21). Designing educational spaces for students & colleagues. Council on Programs in Technical & Scientific Communication, Lubbock, TX.

abstract
In this roundtable, I focused on issues of being a new faculty member in a department and how I created a research identity that was transparent, if a little “quirky,” so that colleagues could begin to recognize my research agenda.

accompanying materials

"Trans-cultural Multimedia Production in an English Classroom"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2005, September 7). Trans-cultural multimedia production in an English classroom. Conference of Open Source Learning & Instructional Technology, Logan, UT.

abstract
In English studies, the past decade has seen a dramatic shift toward analysis and production of multimedia texts (c.f. Cope & Kalantzis, 2000; Wysocki, Selfe, Johnson-Eilola, & Sirc, 2004). This shift is informed by the study of rhetoric, which we define as reading and composing texts with an understanding of a specific audience, purpose, and context. In Dr. Ball’s Perspectives on Writing and Rhetoric class, students analyze creative multimodal texts using multiple reading strategies, and then compose their own texts. Although this generation of students is typically well-informed about technology, most of them have never encountered a digital, multimodal text whose purpose is primarily aesthetic. Studying the rhetorical situation in what literary theorists such as Eco and Rosenblatt would call an “open,” readerdriven, adaptable text provides a rich learning experience for students.In this class, students read several examples of open texts including “Murmuring Insects” (Ankerson, 2001), which successfully uses Eastern and Western multimodal elements—including written, aural, visual, animated, and other modes of communication—to juxtapose calm with fear while honoring the events of September 11, 2001. In this presentation, we show this piece in contrast to student-produced multimodal texts that attempt to adopt cultural contexts of other writers, often unsuccessfully. We conclude by suggesting why some students’ attempts at adaptation in these creative and social media are hindered by localized contexts. In addition, we demonstrate how students who don’t attempt to adapt their creative work to other’s contexts often make stronger rhetorical choices in their multimodal texts while still meeting the needs of various audiences.

accompanying materials

"Rhetoric, Technology, & Aesthetics in New Media Spaces"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2005, June 17). Hackers, schmoozers, & wonder: Rhetoric, technology, & aesthetics in new media spaces. Computers & Writing, Palo Alto, CA.

abstract
In this session, I presented on a “rhetoric of wow,” drawing on Geoffrey Sirc’s (2001) notion of a Happenings pedagogy and Philip Fisher’s (2003) poetics of wonder and thought. I apply that rhetoric to a student-produced video poem, to offer the audience a method of analysis/assessment of digital media texts.

accompanying materials

  • not available

see also

"The Status of New Media Pedagogy in Composition Studies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2005, March 19). Throwing teachers over the top rope: The status of new media pedagogy in composition studies. Conference on College Composition & Communication, San Francisco, CA.

abstract
Presenters in this session reported on the research questions, methodologies, and initial results from a CCCC Research Survey on multimodal composition.

accompanying materials

  • not available

see also

"Editing as Rhetoric Research"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2008, December 30). Roundtable on rhetoric research: Editing as rhetoric research. Modern Language Association, San Francisco, CA.

abstract
In this roundtable presentation, seven presenters produced papers or video descriptions answering the question “what is rhetoric research?” Session chairs Jenn Fishmann and Stacy Pigg mixed the individual presentations together into a whole that showcased several threads running through each presenter’s remarks. I addressed how editing digital media scholarship is a form of rhetoric research through showing the intellectual labor of editorial processes.

accompanying materials

  • my 5-minute video
  • the 30-minute video is not available