Archive for Presentations, Conference

"The Both/And of Faculty, Undergraduate Digital Scholarship"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2009, January 7). The both/and of faculty, undergraduate digital scholarship. Conference for the Center of Teaching and Learning with Technology, Normal, IL.

abstract
This presentation tracks two ecologies: (1) an undergraduate multimodal composition class producing digital scholarship for a digital book collection, and (2) the teacher’s work on that digital collection alongside the production of her tenure e-portfolio. Both students and teacher have asked the following questions in and about their research: What can students teach teachers? What can teachers learn from students? What does digital scholarship look like for undergraduates and faculty? These are ubiquitous questions in our field, and I will show examples from both ecologies to discuss possible answers to these questions, from which larger questions arise: How can a multimodal composition class contribute to the sustainability of academic writing? How can the obstacles of low-access computing promote digital scholarship in which undergraduate students talk back to the scholars who are often talking at, not with, them? In answering these questions (in light of the class’s scholarly project and the teacher’s current work in digital scholarship), I argue that teaching, learning, and composing digital scholarship across student–teacher barriers provides sustainable ways for digital media scholars to connect their undergraduate curricula with their research lives.

accompanying materials

"B-Movie Virgin Sacrifice: Digital Scholarship in a Print-Tenure World"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2009, March 12). B-Movie virgin sacrifice: Digital scholarship in a print-tenure world. Conference on College Composition & Communication, San Francisco, CA.

abstract
In this presentation, I respond to pressures that tenure and promotion evaluators do not know how to read digital scholarship (MLA “Evaluating Scholarship” Report, 2006) and do not value the peer-review system used to evaluate digital scholarship (Ball, 2008; Jenson & Olson, 2009). Such devaluation affects the choices that tenure-track scholars make regarding in what media they can and should produce their scholarship (Anderson et al, 2006), which leads to a cycle of non-production and continued non-evaluation of new media. To save hirself from the print-tenure volcano, Speaker 2 foregrounds production as an analytical method by screening a video tutorial composed to help evaluators read new media scholarship.

accompanying materials

  • video (cross-listed in Research Designs)

"Sustainable Teaching & Learning through Co-Directed Undergraduate & Faculty Digital Scholarship"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., with Matthew Wendling. (2009, June 20). ‘When we ask ourselves these questions, what will our answers be?’: Sustainable teaching and learning through co-directed undergraduate and faculty digital scholarship. Computers & Writing, University of California–Davis.

abstract
This presentation tracks two ecologies: (1) an undergraduate multimodal composition class producing digital scholarship for a digital book collection, and (2) the teacher’s work on that digital collection alongside the production of her tenure e-portfolio. Issues in digital scholarship transcend student–teacher barriers and provide sustainable ways for digital media scholars to connect their undergraduate curricula with their research lives. The presentation concludes with response-comments from an undergraduate student, Matthew Wendling, who worked on these issues with the instructor.

accompanying materials

"Value Added: The Shape of the E-Journal"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2009, December 28). Value added: The shape of the e-journal. Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, PA.

abstract
A poster-like session of electronic journal editors focusing on what one can do with online journals that would not be possible in print journals. I address digital media scholarship through examination of my role as editor of Kairos.

accompanying materials

"Mentoring Electronically and From a Distance"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E, & Rickly, Becky. (2010, March 17). Mentoring electronically and from a distance. Coalition of Women Scholars. Conference on College Composition and Communication, Louisville, KY.

abstract
In roundtable style, Rickly and Ball will offer suggestions for how to distance-mentor (and be mentored) through use of information communication technologies.

accompanying materials

  • not available yet

"New Media Scholarship: Taxonomies, Heuristics, and Strategies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2008, May 23). New media scholarship: Taxonomies, heuristics, and strategies to connect authors, editors, departments, and tenure committees. Computers and Writing, Athens, GA.

abstract
In this presentation, I draw on Allison Warner’s (2007) heuristic for assessing the scholarly value of traditional webtexts that fall between print-like and multimedia-rich, digital scholarship. Warner intentionally leaves room for other scholars to explore the ways that such a heuristic might be applicable (or flexible) for texts that incorporate multimedia elements, such as new media scholarship. The purpose of this presentation is to posit additional heuristics — and the complications of adding more heuristics — for emerging new media scholarly conventions that can be of use to tenure and promotion stakeholders.

accompanying materials

"Peer Review in New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2008, April 4). Peer-review in new media: The process of evaluation as example for tenure and promotion committees. Conference on College Composition & Communication, New Orleans, LA.

abstract
The MLA Report on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion (2006) renews the legitimacy gap between refereed print articles and refereed electronic articles, indicating that, “print articles count […] in 97.9% of departments, as compared with 46.8% for articles in electronic form.” The report notes, however, that electronic forms often don’t take into consideration new media forms of scholarship, such as the “innovative webtexts” published by several online journals in composition and rhetoric, and which James English (2005) wrote in the Journal of Scholarship Publishing as being an inconsequential form of scholarship. As the MLA Report suggests, the value of peer-reviewed digital publications might be greater if tenure committees knew how to read them, a problem that is heightened by the unfamiliarity of new media scholarship. To help, I examine a webtext to show how authors, editors, and review boards value a new media publication so as to provide an example for understanding scholarly innovation, which T&P committees can follow.

accompanying materials