Archive for Presentations, Invited

"Digital Scholarship and the Future of Composition Studies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E, & Blair, Kristine. (2008, April 2). Digital scholarship and the future of composition studies: A call to action. Research Network Forum, Conference on College Composition & Communication. New Orleans, LA.

abstract
The Research Network Forum (RNF) is a pre-conference all-day workshop for graduate students and junior scholars who are mentored on current research projects by senior scholars in the field of rhetoric and composition. During this shared plenary talk, Kris Blair (editor of Computers and Composition Online) spoke about professional development and Preparing Future Faculty in regards to the need to include digital media in graduate program curricula, including encouraging students to publish digital scholarship. I followed Blair and spoke about the current state of digital scholarship in the humanities, summing up with tips for graduate students, junior faculty, and senior faculty about publishing (and supporting the “counting” of) digital scholarship in their respective departments.

accompanying materials

  • RNF talk (mp3 audio file of my portion of talk)

"What’s the Point of New Media?" (v. OSU)

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2008, February 1). What’s the point of new media?  Evaluating transitional, digital scholarship. English Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

abstract
Professor Ball will speak on “What’s the Point of New Media? Evaluating Transitional, Digital Scholarship.” In this presentation, she will address the recent MLA Task Force report, Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion (2006), which acknowledges an increasing need for thoughtful new strategies of evaluating digital scholarship in departments of English. Professor Ball will look at a contemporary heuristic (Warner, 2007) for reading and evaluating “webtexts” (texts that convey most of their meaning through text and hyperlinks) and compare them to “new media texts” that use multimodal elements to enact and convey meaning. This talk will be especially relevant for colleagues who might be involved in reading and evaluating new media texts during tenure and promotion cases. The presentation will be exploratory–just like the new media texts that it investigates–and discussion/interaction from the audience will be encouraged.

accompanying materials

  • Note: The heuristic comes from Allison Brovey Warner’s (2007) dissertation entitled, Assessing the Scholarly Value of Online Texts (U of Maryland).

"Combining Academic and Aesthetic Practices in New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2007, March 31). Composing from the underground: Combining academic and aesthetic practices in new media. Jacobson Symposium in Teaching with Technology. Creighton University, Omaha, NE.

abstract
In this keynote, I draw on Joe Marshall Hardin’s (2001) descriptions from Opening Spaces on English studies and aestheticism and the binaries between high and low art cultures, as represented by literature and composition studies. In speaking about aesthetic versus academic literacies, I discuss a sample new media text that a student produced (Robert Watkins’ “Words are the Ultimate Abstraction”) and show how new media production in our classes can bridge the gap between high and low literacies.

accompanying materials

see also