Tag Archive for closed-access

"Documenting the Process of Building a Digital Tenure Binder"

citation
Interviewed by Genevieve Critel. (2008, February). Documenting the process of building a digital tenure binder [Video]. Intro to Digital Media [course assignment]. Ohio State University.

description
This hour-long video, in which I was interviewed by Genevieve Critel for her Intro to Digital Media graduate class at OSU, discusses how and why I am preparing a digital tenure portfolio.

accompanying materials

  • video not currently available

Quoted in "Clash of Text Styles"

citation
Coulter, Phyllis. (2008, May 28). Clash of text styles. Pantagraph [Newspaper]. Life/Education section.

description
A local  article about changing writing habits of students due to increased use of digital technology.

accompanying materials

"Technobabe Times"

citation
Designer. (2003–04). Technobabe Times [Newsletter]. Michigan Technological University.

abstract
I was the newsletter designer for this print publication. The newsletter was an on-campus and community feminist publication for women and men who worked with technology, distributing local and national news and local opinions and information about women’s causes such as health care and equality. (On a campus with an 5:1 male to female student ratio, a feminist newsletter was an important campus outreach activity.)

accompanying materials

"C Literary Magazine"

citation
Production Manager. (2003–04). C Literary Magazine. Michigan Technological University.

abstract
I started this 64-page, perfect-bound undergraduate literary magazine to publish winners from the campus’s annual undergraduate literary contest. Students in my Publications and Information Management (HU 3630) class created the magazine’s title and design and performed basic editing on the collection. I supervised their work and performed final design revisions and editing for the press publication.

[Note: C Literary Magazine was published from 2003 until 2006, when a faculty member transitioned it into a national journal, PANK Magazine (personal correspondence, M. Bartely Seigel, 2007).]

accompanying materials

  • not available; closed-access

"Synopsis"

citation
Designer/Editor. (2005–06). Synopsis. Utah State University. [2006 Winner of STC Newsletter competition].

abstract
Synopsis is the print newsletter for Utah State University’s student chapter of  the Society for Technical Communication. I edited and directed the newsletter design as interim faculty advisor for the group.

accompanying materials

  • not available/closed-access

"English Studies: Redbird Style!"

citation
Producer. (2009, September 25). English studies: Redbird style! [Promotional video]. Presented at Executive-in-Residence Forum, English Department, Illinois State University.

abstract
This 6-minute promotional video was filmed by several faculty and staff members in the English Department at Illinois State University to showcase the variety of disciplines that “English Studies” covers. I coordinated filming assignments, editing, and produced the final video.

accompanying materials

  • not available

"Review of Inside the Communication Revolution"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2003). Review of Inside the communication revolution: Evolving patterns of social & technical interaction, Robin Mansell (Ed.). Journal of Business & Technical Communication, 18, 248–251.

accompanying materials

  • not available; closed-access publication

"Review of Writing Spaces, 2nd edition"

citation
Ilyasova, Ksenia, & Ball, Cheryl E. (2004). Review of Writing spaces, 2nd ed., by Jay David Bolter. Technical Communication Quarterly, 13, 135–138.

abstract
self-explanatory

accompanying materials

  • Not available; Closed-access publication.

"Trans-cultural Multimedia Production in an English Classroom"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2005). Trans-cultural multimedia production in an English classroom. Proceedings for Advancing the Effectiveness and Sustainability of Open Education Conference. Utah State University, Logan, UT.

abstract
In English studies, the past decade has seen a dramatic shift toward analysis and production of multimedia texts (c.f. Cope & Kalantzis, 2000; Wysocki, Selfe, Johnson-Eilola, & Sirc, 2004). This shift is informed by the study of rhetoric, which we defi ne as reading and composing texts with an understanding of a specifi c audience, purpose, and context. In Dr. Ball’s Perspectives on Writing and Rhetoric class, students analyze creative multimodal texts using multiple reading strategies, and then compose their own texts. Although this generation of students is typically well-informed about technology, most of them have never encountered a digital, multimodal text whose purpose is primarily aesthetic. Studying the rhetorical situation in what literary theorists such as Eco and Rosenblatt would call an “open,” readerdriven, adaptable text provides a rich learning experience for students.In this class, students read several examples of open texts including “Murmuring Insects” (Ankerson, 2001), which successfully uses Eastern and Western multimodal elements—including written, aural, visual, animated, and other modes of communication—to juxtapose calm with fear while honoring the events of September 11, 2001. In this presentation, we show this piece in contrast to student-produced multimodal texts that attempt to adopt cultural contexts of other writers, often unsuccessfully. We conclude by suggesting why some students’ attempts at adaptation in these creative and social media are hindered by localized contexts. In addition, we demonstrate how students who don’t attempt to adapt their creative work to other’s contexts often make stronger rhetorical choices in their multimodal texts while still meeting the needs of various audiences.

see also

"On the Rawness of Reading and Writing New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Kalmbach, James. (forthcoming, 2009/10). On the rawness of reading and writing new media: Materialities, histories, and happenstance. In Cheryl E. Ball & James Kalmbach (Eds.) Reading and writing new media (pp. 1–14). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton.

abstractraw-intro
This chapter is the introduction to the edited collection, Reading and Writing New Media. It introduces the concept for the book: a happenstance of theory about new media in digital writing studies suited to the particular moments in time (mid- to late-2000s) in which the book is published.

status

  • see entry for edited collection (linked below)

accompanying materials

see also