Tag Archive for closed-access

"Integrating Multimodality into Composition Curricula"

citation
Atkins, Anthony; Anderson, Daniel; Ball, Cheryl; Homicz Millar, Krista; Selfe, Cynthia; & Selfe, Richard. (2006). Integrating multimodality in composition curricula: Survey methodology and results from a CCCC Research Initiative grant. Composition Studies, 34(2), 59-84.

abstract
This article describes methodology and outcomes of a national survey conducted in 2005 to discover how instructors use multimodal composition practices in their writing classrooms and research. The authors describe the procedures they used to collect and analyze data from writing teachers about the production, distribution, interpretation, and consumption of multimodal composition. Supported by a research initiative of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the survey was designed to identify the instruction occurring at institutions with a nascent or established curriculum of multimodal pedagogy in which students and faculty members produce texts that combine words, images, and sound as composing resources. The aim of this project was to produce a snapshot of those programs working to define multimodal composition and to integrate these new semiotic forms into writing classes.

accompanying materials

see also

"Designerly ≠ Readerly"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, November). Designerly ≠ readerly: Re-assessing multimodal and new media rubrics for writing studies. Convergence: The International Journal for Research into New Media Technologies, 12, 393–412. Special issue on re-assessing new media.

abstract
In this article, I draw on Gunther Kress and Theo van Leeuwen’s (2001) Multimodal Discourse: The Modes and Media of Contemporary Communication and Lev Manovich’s (2001) The Language of New Media, which have become prevalent texts in US writing studies fields—a place where multimodal and new media theories have made inroads in the last five years. I briefly describe each of the rubrics the authors used and show how they help readers determine the materialities of multimodal or new media texts. I also argue, however, that writing studies scholars should not rely solely on these rubrics because they function in descriptive ways rather than in interpretive ways for new media texts. In other words, I will show that while a reader could use these rubrics to describe some of the design elements in new media texts, readers cannot use the rubrics to interpret those design elements in ways that would allow them to form a reading of the text. I apply the rubrics to a new media text, “While Chopping Red Peppers” (Ankerson, 2000), to show their limited use and to suggest that while these multimodal and new media theories have a place in writing studies, we need better methods and/or reading heuristics in order to interpret (and teach) such works.

accompanying materials

"RAW: Reading and Writing New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Kalmbach, James. (Eds.). (forthcoming). RAW: Reading and writing new media. Hampton Press: Cresskill, NJ.

abstract
RAW (Reading & Writing) New Media
is an edited collection of contemporary theoretical and pedagogical issues in new media studies. Chapters are written by a range of digital writing studies scholars, from graduate students to full professors. There is an accompanying website to the book.raw-cover

status

  • In progress: Prospectus and four chapters go to MIT Press in November 2006, for consideration. 18 chapters are in final editing stages.
  • Accepted for publication: Book is forthcoming from Hampton Press (Fall/Winter 2009) with 21 chapters.
  • In press/Update 9/12/09: Final proofs have been checked.
  • In press/Update 10/20/09: Index has been completed.

accompanying materials

"Letter from the Guest Editors"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (2006). Letter from the guest editors. Computers and Composition, 23(3), 263–265.

abstract
Because of the rise in multiliteracies scholarship since 1999, and with it a dramatic increase in the kinds of texts students read and compose in writing classrooms, this special issue hopes to introduce readers to a next step in multiliteracies composition. That is, we’ve moved—as a field—from linguistic to visual meaning-making, all in digital environments; so, a logical progression is to include other modes of meaning including audio. In doing so, we hope to provide readers with an overview of how a multiliteracies approach that incorporates attention to audio is possible within composition studies. The seven articles in this issue explore forms of audio from several theoretical, historical, and musical perspectives, adding a breadth and richness to current scholarship that uses sound in compositional practices. The authors discuss a range of sonic genres including opera, hip-hop, rock-n-roll, as well as voiceovers and soundtracks. The timeline of these genres covers centuries, from Wagner to digital multimodality (if not virtual reality, although that’s mentioned along the way). The authors connect their discussion of audio—from sampling, sound effects, professional and amateur recordings, and hypermediation—to composition and knowledge-making methods as diverse as using citation systems and teaching sonic literacies.

accompanying materials

Special Issue: Sound in/as Compositional Space

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (Eds.). (2006, September). Computers & Composition [Special issue: Sound in/as compositional space: A next step in multiliteracies]. 23(3), 263-398.

abstract
This special issue addresses the rhetoric of aural and oral modes of communication in writing studies. The articles in this collection vary from exploring the implications of hip-hop sampling on academic citation systems to using pop songs as thesis statements in professional and student-produced movies.

accompanying materials

"Show, Not Tell: The Value of New Media Scholarship"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2004). Show, not tell: The value of new media scholarship. Computers & Composition, 21(4). 403–425.

abstract
In this article, I consider the changing nature of publications in relation to technology and tenure, presenting a taxonomy of scholarly publications: online scholarship, scholarship about new media, and new media scholarship. I offer a focused definition of new media texts as ones that juxtapose semiotic modes in new and aesthetically pleasing ways and, in doing so, break away from print traditions so that written text is not the primary rhetorical means. By applying this definition to scholarly online publications, readers can be better prepared to recognize and interpret the meaning-making potential of aesthetic modes used in new media scholarly texts. I conclude by offering an analysis of a scholarly new media text, “Digital Multiliteracies.”

accompanying materials

"Picturing Texts Instructor's Guide"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2004). Picturing Texts instructor’s guide. New York: W.W. Norton (pp. 1-114).

pictextsinstrguide2abstract
The Instructor’s Guide, which accompanies the Picturing Texts (Selfe, George, Palchek, & Faigley, 2004) composition textbook, suggests starting points for working with the discussion questions, advice to give students about the writing prompts, syllabi for several ways of using the book, and other ideas for working with Picturing Texts.

accompanying materials

  • a review in C&C Online
  • a review in Kairos
  • This is a closed-access, print publication. For a copy, please contact a Norton sales rep.