Tag Archive for collaborative

"Reinventing the Possibilities"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Moeller, Ryan M. (2007). Reinventing the possibilities: Academic literacy and new media. Fibreculture Journal, 10. http://journal.fibreculture.org/issue10/ball_moeller/index.html

abstractfibreculture
This webtext demonstrates the possibilities of using new media to teach students critical literacy skills applicable to the 21st century. It is a manifesto for what we think writing scholars should be teaching in general-education “writing” classes like first-year composition. In order to answer the question of what we should teach, we have to ask what kinds of academic literacy, if any, we value. We argue here that rhetorical theory is a productive way to theorize how meaning is made among new media texts, their designers, and their readers. We use the Ancient Greek concepts of topoi and commonplace to explain how designers and readers enter into a space of negotiated meaning-making when converging upon new media texts. That negotiated space offers a new-media space for learning critical literacies by means other than research papers. As examples, we discuss two student texts and the literacies they demonstrate.

accompanying materials

"From 'They Call me Doctor?!' to Tenure"

citation
Arola, Kristin L., & Ball, Cheryl E. (2007, Spring). A conversation: From ‘They call me doctor?!’ to tenure. Computers and Composition Online. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/doctor

abstractdoctor
This webtext was invited by the editors of the Professional Development section of Computers and Composition Online, and it represents the professional and personal issues that often occur for new faculty members as they transition from being graduate students. The purpose of this webtext is to invite conversation, collaboration, and mentorship between the authors, the collaborators who contributed advice about this transitionary period in academics lives, and by readers of the text.

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award note
This webtext was the Finalist for the 2007 Kairos Best Webtext Award.

Data from "Integrating Multimodality"

citation
Anderson, Daniel; Anthony Atkins, Cheryl Ball, Krista Homicz Millar, Cynthia Selfe, Dickie Selfe [Writers], & Matt Bemer [Designer]. (2006). Data from a CCCC research grant survey on teaching multimodal composition. Composition Studies 34(2). http://www.compositionstudies.tcu.edu/archives/342/cccc-data/

abstractcompstudies-data
This website accompanies an article appearing in the print version of Composition Studies entitled “Integrating Multimodality in Composition Curricula: Survey Methodology and Results from a CCCC Research Initiative Grant.” In that article the authors provided methodologies and outcomes of a national survey conducted in 2005 to discover how instructors use multimodal composition practices in their writing classrooms and research. Supported by a research initiative of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the survey was designed to identify instruction in which students and faculty members produce (not just analyze) multimodal texts. The aim of that article is to present a snapshot of instructors working to integrate these new semiotic forms into writing classes. The data in this report includes the questions from and responses to the 141-question survey.

accompanying materials

"Integrating Multimodality into Composition Curricula"

citation
Atkins, Anthony; Anderson, Daniel; Ball, Cheryl; Homicz Millar, Krista; Selfe, Cynthia; & Selfe, Richard. (2006). Integrating multimodality in composition curricula: Survey methodology and results from a CCCC Research Initiative grant. Composition Studies, 34(2), 59-84.

abstract
This article describes methodology and outcomes of a national survey conducted in 2005 to discover how instructors use multimodal composition practices in their writing classrooms and research. The authors describe the procedures they used to collect and analyze data from writing teachers about the production, distribution, interpretation, and consumption of multimodal composition. Supported by a research initiative of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the survey was designed to identify the instruction occurring at institutions with a nascent or established curriculum of multimodal pedagogy in which students and faculty members produce texts that combine words, images, and sound as composing resources. The aim of this project was to produce a snapshot of those programs working to define multimodal composition and to integrate these new semiotic forms into writing classes.

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see also

"RAW: Reading and Writing New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Kalmbach, James. (Eds.). (forthcoming). RAW: Reading and writing new media. Hampton Press: Cresskill, NJ.

abstract
RAW (Reading & Writing) New Media
is an edited collection of contemporary theoretical and pedagogical issues in new media studies. Chapters are written by a range of digital writing studies scholars, from graduate students to full professors. There is an accompanying website to the book.raw-cover

status

  • In progress: Prospectus and four chapters go to MIT Press in November 2006, for consideration. 18 chapters are in final editing stages.
  • Accepted for publication: Book is forthcoming from Hampton Press (Fall/Winter 2009) with 21 chapters.
  • In press/Update 9/12/09: Final proofs have been checked.
  • In press/Update 10/20/09: Index has been completed.

accompanying materials

"The Rhetoric and Pedagogy of Portable Technologies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2004). The rhetoric and pedagogy of portable technologies [column + graphic]. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 9(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/9.1

description

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

This editorial column introduced four webtexts on wireless technologies, focusing on the rhetoric and pedagogy of wireless labs and writing classrooms, but also on whether these technologies actually help or hinder our teaching.

accompanying materials

"Computers & Writing 2005: New Writing and Computer Technologies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2006). Computers & Writing 2005: New writing and computer technologies. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(2). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/10.2/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.htm

description

Issue art designed by Leah Cassorla

Issue art designed by Leah Cassorla

This editorial column focuses on webtexts that originated as presentations at the 2005 Computers and Writing conference. This CoverWeb (themed) section contained six webtexts on a range of topics related to technology and writing studies.

accompanying materials

"Letter from the Guest Editors"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (2006). Letter from the guest editors. Computers and Composition, 23(3), 263–265.

abstract
Because of the rise in multiliteracies scholarship since 1999, and with it a dramatic increase in the kinds of texts students read and compose in writing classrooms, this special issue hopes to introduce readers to a next step in multiliteracies composition. That is, we’ve moved—as a field—from linguistic to visual meaning-making, all in digital environments; so, a logical progression is to include other modes of meaning including audio. In doing so, we hope to provide readers with an overview of how a multiliteracies approach that incorporates attention to audio is possible within composition studies. The seven articles in this issue explore forms of audio from several theoretical, historical, and musical perspectives, adding a breadth and richness to current scholarship that uses sound in compositional practices. The authors discuss a range of sonic genres including opera, hip-hop, rock-n-roll, as well as voiceovers and soundtracks. The timeline of these genres covers centuries, from Wagner to digital multimodality (if not virtual reality, although that’s mentioned along the way). The authors connect their discussion of audio—from sampling, sound effects, professional and amateur recordings, and hypermediation—to composition and knowledge-making methods as diverse as using citation systems and teaching sonic literacies.

accompanying materials

Special Issue: Sound in/as Compositional Space

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (Eds.). (2006, September). C&C Online [Special issue: Sound in/as compositional space]. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/sound

abstract
This special issue addresses the rhetoric of aural and oral modes of communication. The webtexts (interactive online articles) in this collection vary from audio performances exemplifying multimodal mash-up techniques to the rhetorical implications of sound in student-created music videos.

sound-introaccompanying materials

  • table of contents (to read individual webtexts, click on the graphic icons for each)
  • introduction [Quicktime movie; 37 mb — I recommend downloading it to your desktop before viewing. It’ll take several minutes to load.]

Special Issue: Sound in/as Compositional Space

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (Eds.). (2006, September). Computers & Composition [Special issue: Sound in/as compositional space: A next step in multiliteracies]. 23(3), 263-398.

abstract
This special issue addresses the rhetoric of aural and oral modes of communication in writing studies. The articles in this collection vary from exploring the implications of hip-hop sampling on academic citation systems to using pop songs as thesis statements in professional and student-produced movies.

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