Tag Archive for collaborative

"The Intersections of Online Writing Spaces, Rhetorical Theory, and the Composition Classroom"

citation
Cassorla, Leah; Ball, Cheryl E. [Graphic]; & Hewett, Beth L. (2005). The intersections of online writing spaces, rhetorical theory, and the composition classroom. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/10.1/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.htm

description

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

This CoverWeb (themed section) column introduces four webtexts about online communication. The texts include topics such as teaching digital writing, using templates and wikis in the classroom, and researching place-based blogs.

accompanying materials

"sound+composition+space"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (2006). sound+composition+space [Video]. C&C Online. [Special issue: Sound]. http://ceball.com/other/cconline/sound/intro1.mov

abstractsound
This mash-up of video and audio pieces serves as an introduction to the special issue on sound. Like a traditional “letter from the guest editors,” in which editors contextualize and provide abtracts of the articles in a special issue, this mash-up provides “abstracts” of video and audio that are included in the authors’ texts, thereby contextualizing them by juxtaposing the multiple modes of communication in one text. By splicing samples together (a la the hip hop tradition) from the 14 authors’ pieces, this introduction enacts the performative, aesthetic qualities that the authors articulate are necessary to composition studies in the 21st century. From visual and aural noise at the beginning of the intro, the editors move into an argument for including sound as part of digital writing’s compositional space — that sampling, voiceovers, cut-ups, and other oral/aural considerations can take us into what happens next in writing studies. (Note: Video hosted on my website due to space limitations on C&C Online server.)

accompanying materials

see also

"Reading the Text: A Rhetoric of Wow"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Rice, Rich. (2006). Reading the text: Remediating the text. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(2). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/10.2/binder2.html?coverweb/riceball

abstractriceball
This webtext, presented as a DVD interface, discusses the situational contexts of teachers’ assessment practices in student-produced new media texts. Ball discusses a “rhetoric of wow” in approaching the reading of student texts from technorhetorical and poetic lenses while Rice discusses using that rhetorical knowledge to avoid “schmoozery” (i.e., being bamboozled by students’ flashy, but arhetorical, technological prowess). The central discussion of this text focuses on a student-produced video for one of Ball’s classes, with the authors’ arguments about this text (and its rhetorical and pedagogical situating in the field) presented as DVD “extras” in the interface.

accompanying materials

"ix tech comm"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. & Arola, Kristin L. (2005). ix tech comm: visual exercises for technical communication [CD-ROM]. Boston: Bedford–St. Martin’s.

abstract [from CD cover]ix-techcomm
ix tech comm offers a new way to visualize technical communication—because there are things you just can’t do in a book. Each of the 9 exercises moves through the following three steps: (1) Illustrated definitions help students visualize key concepts: text, purpose, element, context, audeince, color, contrast, emphasis, framing, alignment, proximity, organization, and sequence. (2) Guided analyses of real world texts—such as an X-men plane schematic, a bicycling safety PowerPoint presentation, and an illustrated recipe—model for students how to put theory into practice. (3) Interactive assignments invite students to make their own rhetorical choices—changing colors, determining alignment and typeface, and rearranging the elements of a web site’s navigation—and to write about the impact those choices have.

accompanying materials

  • link to CD-ROM’s accompanying website
  • email from teacher who uses ix: tech comm

"ix visual exercises"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. & Arola, Kristin L. (2004). ix: visual exercises [CD-ROM]. Boston: Bedford–St. Martin’s.

abstract
This CD-ROM introduces visual rhetoric theories to students and teachers using rhetorical terms with which they are already familiar. It includes visual readings and assignments that students in cultural-studies-focused writing classes are likely to encounter (e.g., advertisements, photographs, comics, illustrations, interactive web movies, etc.). The CD contains nine sections (i.e., “ix”); each section has approximately 20 unique screens of content. Total screen count is approximately 200.ix

status

  • Update 01/09: Over 95,200 copies of ix have been distributed.

accompanying materials

  • link to CD-ROM website
  • review of CD from “next/text: what happens when textbooks go digital”, a subdivision of the Institute for the Future of the Book (linked to Internet Archive version; site has moved since 2005)
  • review of CD in Computers and Composition
  • email from teacher using ix

"Kairos: The Next Ten Years"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., Hewett, Beth L. Eyman, Douglas, & Inman, James. (2006). Kairos: The next ten years. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 11(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/11.1/loggingon

description

Issue art designed by Tracy Bridgeford

Issue art designed by Tracy Bridgeford

The Logging On column in Kairos is equivalent to the editor’s letter in print journals. (This was my first time writing this column after being promoted to Editor.) The column outlines the vision changes that I and my co-editor initiated with the journal (as well as some that the Senior Editors initiated in their new position). Some of those changes include adding new sections that highlight and explain how to read experimental, multimodal scholarship; updating our unique peer-review process (which involves collaboration among 50+ nationally recognized scholars), and more. We also outline the historically focused webtexts published in the anniversary issue.

accompanying materials

Computers and Composition

title/status

  • Associate Editor, 2003-04 (of note: responsible for copy-editing the 20th anniversary double issue)
  • Assistant Editor, 2000-03

description

Computers and Composition is a professional journal devoted to exploring the use of computers in composition classes, programs, and scholarly projects. It provides teachers and scholars a forum for discussing issues connected to Image of journal covercomputer use. The journal also offers information about integrating digital composing environments into writing programs on the basis of sound theoretical and pedagogical decisions and empirical evidence.

My role as associate editor of Computers and Composition was to oversee editorial production for the quarterly, print journal. I copy-edited, proofread, and corresponded with authors and publishers at Elsevier and trained new graduate students to copy-edit the journal. C&C was located at  Michigan Technological University until 2005, which is where I worked under the co-editor, Cynthia Selfe.

see also

  • service learning instructor of C&C editing/training sessions