Tag Archive for multimedia

“CIWIC, DMAC, and Technology Professional Development in Rhet/Comp” double special issue

citations

DeVoss, Dànielle Nicole; Ball, Cheryl E.; Selfe, Cynthia; & DeWitt, Scott Lloyd. (Eds.). (2015, June). CIWIC, DMAC, and technology professional development in rhetoric and composition [Special issue]. Computers and Composition, 36, 1-66.

Ball, Cheryl E.; DeVoss, Dànielle Nicole; Selfe, Cynthia; & DeWitt, Scott Lloyd. (Eds.). (2015, June). CIWIC, DMAC, and technology professional development in rhetoric and composition [Special issue]. Computers and Composition Online. Retrieved from http://casit.bgsu.edu/cconline/ciwic_dmac/CC_ONLINE_INTRO/

abstract

CIWIC–Computers in Writing-Intensive Classrooms–and its spin-off, DMAC–Digital Media and Composition–celebrated their combined 30th anniversary during the Summer of 2015. These special issues mark that anniversary by exploring how rhetoric and composition scholars who attended CIWIC or DMAC have integrated that technological professional development experience into their academic lives. These special issues are a scholarly tribute and celebration of these internationally known workshops.

supplemental materials

 

"visualizing composition"

Ball, Cheryl E., & Arola, Kristin L. (2010). visualizing composition (2nd ed.). Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s Press. http://ix.bedfordstmartins.com [password required]

description [the ‘cover’ blurb]

ix visualizing composition is a concrete introduction to the fundamentals of multimodal composition. Each tutorial moves through the following three steps:

  1. Define. Illustrated definitions help you visualize principles of layout, design and composition: element, contrast, purpose, text, framing, audience, alignment, context, emphasis, color, proximity, organization, and sequence.
  2. Analyze. Guided readings of real-world texts—such as photographs, movie clips, comics, and animation—model how writers of different texts put theory into practice.
  3. Respond. Interactive assignments invite you to make your own rhetorical choices—determining font face or color, image hue, and the placement and organizational of visual and textual elements—and to write about the impact those choices have.

Note: This is the second edition of ix, the CD-ROM Arola and I co-authored in 2004. In this version, 9 of 13 tutorials (broken down by terms associated with rhetorical design choices) have been completely revised, with new and more multimodal examples and analyses.

"Talking Back to Teachers: Undergraduate Research in Multimodal Composition"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., et al. (in progress). Talking back to teachers: Undergraduate research in multimodal composition. In Debra Journet, Cheryl E. Ball, and Ryan Trauman (Eds.) The new work of composing. Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press.

abstract
This chapter is composed of 14 voices—12 undergraduates, 1 graduate student, and 1 faculty member (Cheryl E. Ball, contact author) from a multimodal composition class at Illinois State University. In a three-part chapter, we speak to the perceptions of undergraduate students’ technology use presented by scholarship, attendees at the Watson conference, and on our campus. The first section, presented as a video, reflects on conference attendees’ discussions of students who weren’t representative of the majority audience (professors and graduate students) at the conference. The second section, also presented as a video, asks how pedagogy needs to change to accommodate an increase in digital technology and what kind of cooperation is necessary between students and their teachers so both parties can effectively communicate to and learn from each other. The third section, presented as a MySpace page, argues that educators should incorporate social networks into their pedagogies because they offer a different way of composing. The sections will be presented together on the class blog, http://www.ceball.com/classes/239, where the index page will become a static Introduction to the chapter and each section will be presented as a page off the index. The benefit of hosting the site (for now) on the 239 class blog is so that readers can explore behind the scenes of our learning experience as we produced digital scholarship this semester.

status

  • 12/08: proposal accepted for the collection
  • 07/09: student projects revised
  • 10/09: collection accepted by press
  • 11/09: final chapter draft being readied for editors

accompanying materials

see also

"Logging On: #CWroundup"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2009). Logging on: #CWroundup. Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, 14(1). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/14.1/loggingon/index.html

description

A partial screenshot of my tweet-based editorial column

A partial screenshot of my tweet-based editorial column

This editorial column, written as a series of tweets (i.e., 140-character Twitter updates), describes the major discussion threads from the 2009 Computers & Writing conference at UC-Davis. One of the keynote speakers at C&W asked audience members to tweet her presentation, which started a large backchannel discussion, so the form of this column is in honor of that session. This column also lists the Kairos award winners presented at C&W (as well as that Kairos design staffers won another award for their redesign efforts), and introduces the webtexts in this issue.

accompanying materials

"Logging On: Kairos FTW!"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2009). Logging on: Kairos FTW! Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 13(2). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/13.2/loggingon/loggingon.html

description
This editorial column announces the journal’s win of the Council of Editors of Learned Journals (CELJ) Design Award, as well as discusses the current state of acceptance of digital (media) scholarship in the humanities, as evidenced by its (lack of) inclusion/understanding in organizations such as the Modern Language Association.

accompanying materials

"Logging On: New Design Debut"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2008). Logging on: New design debut. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 13(1). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/13.1/loggingon/loggingon.html

description

Screenshot from new design issue

Screenshot from new design issue

Readers will already have noticed our biggest announcement for this issue: the redesign! Years in the brainstorming phase, the redesign team of three staffers—Kathie Gossett, Karl Stolley, and Doug Eyman—made it all happen over the last year. They report on design features, including value-added components that have readers in mind, in a separate note in this issue. We thank and congratulate them for a difficult undertaking that was accomplished with little resources and next-to-no time. Wonderful job, folks!

accompanying materials

see also

  • CELJ 2008 Design Award, based on this issue (under Awards)

"Logging on: Manifestos!"

citation
DeWitt, Scott L., & Ball, Cheryl E. (2008). Logging on: Manifestos! [Guest editors’ column]. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 12(3).
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.3/loggingon/index.html

description

Screenshot from Braun & Gilbert's (2008) manifesto, "This is Scholarship"

Screenshot from Braun & Gilbert's (2008) manifesto, "This is Scholarship"

This editorial column (written for the special issue, co-guested-edited with Scott Lloyd DeWitt) introduces the reasons why we wanted to have an issue dedicated to manifestos, as cutting-edge ideas often not published in “scholarly” venues. It also introduces the 8 manifestos (including one collection that includes 9 individual manifestos) we accepted and details the peer-review criteria we used for the submissions.

accompanying materials

"Computers & Writing 2007: Virtual Urbanism"

citation
Hewett, Beth L. & Ball, Cheryl E. (2008). Computers & Writing 2007: Virtual urbanism. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 12(2). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.2/loggingon

abstract

Issue art taken from C&W 2007 catalog (designed by Jeff Rice?)

Issue art taken from C&W 2007 catalog (designed by Jeff Rice?)


In this issue, the Topoi section of Kairos is pleased to showcase three webtexts originating from the 2007 Computers and Writing Conference (C&W) in Detroit: one focused on virtual case environments developed for CMS, the second focused on geoblogging as a way to present students with complex, place-contextualized writing scenarios, and the third focused on the consolations and constraints of words as writing, as speech, and as art.

accompanying materials

"Digital Scholarship"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2007). Digital scholarship. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 12(1). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.1/binder.html?loggingon/index.html

abstract

Issue art designed by Michael Edwards

Issue art designed by Michael Edwards

In this issue, the Topoi section of Kairos is pleased to showcase two webtexts about digital scholarship, which connect to the Praxis section’s theme on tools for composing digital scholarship and the inaugural publication of the Inventio section, the aim of which is to highlight the intellectual labor of composing and reading scholarly webtexts. It’s a meta-theme on digital scholarship IN digital scholarship for this issue!

accompanying materials

"Reflections and Resolutions"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2007). Reflections and resolutions. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 11(2). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/11.2/binder.html?loggingon/

abstract
This editorial column introduces four webtexts published as part of the proceedings for the 2006 Computers & Writing conference in Lubbock, TX.  Conference Chair Rich Rice overviews the conference, and the next two texts discuss issues of using content-management systems such as WebCT. The fourth text offers case studies of online research practices.

accompanying materials