Tag Archive for multimedia

"Disability and Technology"

citation
Hewett, Beth L., & Ball, Cheryl E. (2002). Disability and technology. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 7(1).
http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/7.1/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.html

description

Issue art designed by James Inman

Issue art designed by James Inman

This editorial column introduces five webtexts that discuss issues of disabilities and technologies in writing classrooms, as well as two “conversations” about disability, technology, and webtext authoring captured between several sets of authors in the CoverWeb (themed) section. (This was the first issue of Kairos Beth and I produced as new CoverWeb Editors.)

accompanying materials

"Issues of New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2003). Issues of new media. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 8(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/8.1/binder2.html?coverweb/index.html

description

Issue art designed by Mark Bildeaux (an undergraduate student of Cheryl's, at Michigan Tech)

Issue art designed by Mark Bildeaux (an undergraduate student of Cheryl's, at Michigan Tech)

This editorial column introduces five cutting-edge (in 2003, and some still) webtexts for the new media issue of Kairos. The column also discusses the history and reasons for choosing new media for this issue, definitions of new media that focus on how we distinguished it from other genres of online scholarship, why new media is necessary to explore in scholarship, and the changes in editorial processes we struggled with because of the new media texts that were submitted. (Historical note: This issue of Kairos launched my research agenda into new media scholarship.)

accompanying materials

"Poetry & Song: The Process of Composing"

citation
Designer. (2001). Poetry & Song: The Process of Composing [Website].
http://www.hu.mtu.edu/oldsites/poemandsong

abstract
The Poetry and Song website showcases the relationship between the written word and song. Featuring renowned writer and keyboardist Bill Payne from the group Little Feat, this site lets you explore how professionals approach the craft of songwriting. Payne shares his original poetry and discusses how those poems were transformed into song; his insights are accompanied by rare footage of three Little Feat songs performed in a solo-acoustic format. In addition, you can find a range of resources on poetry and songwriting and even create original songs by combining your lyrics with music samples provided here.

(Note: Site featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education, 5/31/2002)

accompanying materials

  • website (site has been moved since original publication; graphic menu is disabled, so use text-only option)

"Sound in/as Compositional Space" [Video]

citation
Designer/Producer. (2006). Sound in/as compositional space [Video + website]. Computers and Composition Online. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/sound

abstract sound-intro
I designed this website and introductory video for the Sound special issue in C&C Online, which I guest-edited (with Byron Hawk). The video is a 2-minute mash-up/remix of the webtexts contained in the special issue and serves as our “letter from the guest editors” in a multimedia format. (Note: The video is hosted on my server because of space issues on the C&C Online server.)

accompanying materials

see also

"Dr. Cheryl E. Ball: Tenure & Promotion Portfolio"

citation
Designer/Author. (2006–present). Dr. Cheryl E. Ball: Tenure & Promotion Portfolio. http://www.ceball.com

abstract
This digital portfolio, which uses the WordPress blogging platform as its technological base, has been specifically designed (using an author-modified, open-source WordPress template) to host a living version of my CV for access by my tenure readers, students, and readers in my discipline.

accompanying materials

"Constructing a Tool for Assessing Scholarly Webtexts"

citation
Designer. (2007). For Allison Warner [Author], Constructing a tool for assessing scholarly webtexts. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 12(1).
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.1/binder.html?topoi/warner/index.html

abstract
This webtext presents a tool for assessing the scholarly value of online journal publications. It is part of a larger study that uses Kairos webtexts to investigate the scholarly nature of online texts. The goal of this larger study is to deliver a rubric as an instrument to facilitate the acceptance of online texts within English Studies as evidence of scholarship for professional advancement. In order to understand more fully how an online text can be recognized and valued for its scholarly legitimacy, it is crucial to explore the nature of successful (published) online scholarship. The assessment tool presented in this webtext is comprised of questions that help to reveal commonalities and deviations in the function and value of traditional (print) scholarly conventions toward defining an emerging genre of online scholarship. This webtext is designed using a web browser interface that should be familiar to many web readers. Web browsers enable readers to view web pages and provide a gateway to finding information online. This webtext was intentionally designed to draw attention to the interactive ways in which readers can approach texts that are created in or remediated for the Web. This design is mimetic to my thesis, that scholarly webtexts need both familiar and new assessment tools in order to be valued by academic stakeholders.

accompanying materials

"On a Digital Tenure Portfolio"

citation
Writer/Producer. (2009, March 31). On a Digital Tenure Portfolio [Video]. First presented at 2009 Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJJER7diM6c

abstract
This short movie argues for presenting my tenure materials digitally and outlines the following research questions that are relevant to a digital portfolio and multimodal scholarship:

  • How can tenure guidelines be inclusive of nontraditional scholarship?
  • How can the intellectual labor of nontraditional scholarship be demonstrated?
  • How can tenure readers evaluate nontraditional scholarship?
  • How can universities better disseminate scholarship?

The primary audience for this video is the provost and deans of my college, and I presented it at CCCC to get feedback from my disciplinary audience. (Note: The deans saw it and approved my use of a digital portfolio.) The video is linked to from my tenure portfolio: http://www.ceball.com.

accompanying materials


RAW Website

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. [Designer]. (forthcoming, Winter 2009/10). RAW: Reading and writing new media [Website]. http://rawnewmedia.net.

abstract
This website accompanies the eponymous print book collection being published with Hampton Press and includes digital media materials supplied by the chapter authors.

accompanying materials

"States of Digital Scholarship: Review Essay"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (forthcoming, Jan. 2010). States of digital scholarship: Review essay of Scholarship in the digital age by Christine Borgman and Planned obsolescence by Kathleen Fitzpatrick. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 14(2).

abstract
A multimodal review essay of two prominent “books” about digital scholarship, Christine Borgman’s (2007) Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet and Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s online, CommentPress version of her forthcoming book with NYU Press, Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy.

accompanying materials

  • to come

"Digital Scholarship and the New Work of the Book in Composition Studies"

citation
Journet, Debra; Ball, Cheryl E.; & Trauman, Ryan. (in progress). Digital scholarship and the new work of the book in composition studies. In Debra Journet, Cheryl E. Ball, & Ryan Trauman (Eds.) The new work of composing. Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press. http://ccdigitalpress.org

status

  • Update 07/09: Prospectus with introduction submitted to CCDP.
  • Update 10/09: Verbal confirmation from press editor that collection has been accepted.
  • Update 11/09: Email confirmation from press that collection should proceed.

abstract
This introductory chapter to the digital media collection, The New Work of Composing, asks what constitutes a “book” in age of digital scholarship? In a period of digital production, we are pushed to consider what a book is and what it does. How do modes and media change not only how knowledge is produced but also what kind of knowledge is made possible? Which assumptions about the print book—its scope or range, its intellectual possibilities, the kinds of interactions it fosters—are transferable to digital books and which are not? This project lays the groundwork for these questions. The New Work of Composing contains 14 multimodal chapters that are organized around five clusters of issues of related to digital composition. In the introduction, each chapter is described, and the book’s interface is also discussed (e.g., how to read this book).

accompanying materials

see also