Tag Archive for multimedia

Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy

title/status

  • Editor, 2008-present
  • Co-Editor, 2006-2008 (with Beth L. Hewett)
  • Section Co-Editor (CoverWeb, with Beth L. Hewett), 2001-2006

description
Kairos,
which began publishing online in 1996, is an internationally recognized, peer-reviewed journal in digital writing studies. It has a readership of over 45,000 readers a month from over 180 countries and an acceptance rate of 10 percent. The journal publishes three sections of full-length scholarship (Topoi, Praxis, Inventio) and three professional development sections (Reviews, Interviews, Disputatio), which are editorially reviewed by their respective section editors. Issues are openly available on the Web at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net, and are published twice a year, in August and January, with special sections occasionally occurring as a third issue in May. In December 2008, Kairos was recognized by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals for its redesign (the journal’s third look in 13 years), which garnered the CELJ Best Design Award.

small-logoKairos has a longstanding reputation for theoretical and technological innovation, collaborative authorship, editorial mentoring and outreach, and collaborative review processes, all of which support the unique scope and practices of the journal: publishing digital media scholarship that incorporates web-based media to make meaning. The majority of the scholarship Kairos publishes cannot be printed because these web-based articles (i.e., “webtexts”) use interactivity, multiple media including video and audio, and other nonlinear elements to make their scholarly arguments.

see also

"Reinventing the Possibilities"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Moeller, Ryan M. (2007). Reinventing the possibilities: Academic literacy and new media. Fibreculture Journal, 10. http://journal.fibreculture.org/issue10/ball_moeller/index.html

abstractfibreculture
This webtext demonstrates the possibilities of using new media to teach students critical literacy skills applicable to the 21st century. It is a manifesto for what we think writing scholars should be teaching in general-education “writing” classes like first-year composition. In order to answer the question of what we should teach, we have to ask what kinds of academic literacy, if any, we value. We argue here that rhetorical theory is a productive way to theorize how meaning is made among new media texts, their designers, and their readers. We use the Ancient Greek concepts of topoi and commonplace to explain how designers and readers enter into a space of negotiated meaning-making when converging upon new media texts. That negotiated space offers a new-media space for learning critical literacies by means other than research papers. As examples, we discuss two student texts and the literacies they demonstrate.

accompanying materials

"From 'They Call me Doctor?!' to Tenure"

citation
Arola, Kristin L., & Ball, Cheryl E. (2007, Spring). A conversation: From ‘They call me doctor?!’ to tenure. Computers and Composition Online. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/doctor

abstractdoctor
This webtext was invited by the editors of the Professional Development section of Computers and Composition Online, and it represents the professional and personal issues that often occur for new faculty members as they transition from being graduate students. The purpose of this webtext is to invite conversation, collaboration, and mentorship between the authors, the collaborators who contributed advice about this transitionary period in academics lives, and by readers of the text.

accompanying materials

award note
This webtext was the Finalist for the 2007 Kairos Best Webtext Award.

"The Rhetoric and Pedagogy of Portable Technologies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2004). The rhetoric and pedagogy of portable technologies [column + graphic]. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 9(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/9.1

description

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

This editorial column introduced four webtexts on wireless technologies, focusing on the rhetoric and pedagogy of wireless labs and writing classrooms, but also on whether these technologies actually help or hinder our teaching.

accompanying materials

"Computers & Writing 2005: New Writing and Computer Technologies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2006). Computers & Writing 2005: New writing and computer technologies. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(2). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/10.2/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.htm

description

Issue art designed by Leah Cassorla

Issue art designed by Leah Cassorla

This editorial column focuses on webtexts that originated as presentations at the 2005 Computers and Writing conference. This CoverWeb (themed) section contained six webtexts on a range of topics related to technology and writing studies.

accompanying materials

Special Issue: Sound in/as Compositional Space

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (Eds.). (2006, September). C&C Online [Special issue: Sound in/as compositional space]. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/sound

abstract
This special issue addresses the rhetoric of aural and oral modes of communication. The webtexts (interactive online articles) in this collection vary from audio performances exemplifying multimodal mash-up techniques to the rhetorical implications of sound in student-created music videos.

sound-introaccompanying materials

  • table of contents (to read individual webtexts, click on the graphic icons for each)
  • introduction [Quicktime movie; 37 mb — I recommend downloading it to your desktop before viewing. It’ll take several minutes to load.]

"The Intersections of Online Writing Spaces, Rhetorical Theory, and the Composition Classroom"

citation
Cassorla, Leah; Ball, Cheryl E. [Graphic]; & Hewett, Beth L. (2005). The intersections of online writing spaces, rhetorical theory, and the composition classroom. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/10.1/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.htm

description

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

This CoverWeb (themed section) column introduces four webtexts about online communication. The texts include topics such as teaching digital writing, using templates and wikis in the classroom, and researching place-based blogs.

accompanying materials

"sound+composition+space"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (2006). sound+composition+space [Video]. C&C Online. [Special issue: Sound]. http://ceball.com/other/cconline/sound/intro1.mov

abstractsound
This mash-up of video and audio pieces serves as an introduction to the special issue on sound. Like a traditional “letter from the guest editors,” in which editors contextualize and provide abtracts of the articles in a special issue, this mash-up provides “abstracts” of video and audio that are included in the authors’ texts, thereby contextualizing them by juxtaposing the multiple modes of communication in one text. By splicing samples together (a la the hip hop tradition) from the 14 authors’ pieces, this introduction enacts the performative, aesthetic qualities that the authors articulate are necessary to composition studies in the 21st century. From visual and aural noise at the beginning of the intro, the editors move into an argument for including sound as part of digital writing’s compositional space — that sampling, voiceovers, cut-ups, and other oral/aural considerations can take us into what happens next in writing studies. (Note: Video hosted on my website due to space limitations on C&C Online server.)

accompanying materials

see also

"Reading the Text: A Rhetoric of Wow"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Rice, Rich. (2006). Reading the text: Remediating the text. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(2). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/10.2/binder2.html?coverweb/riceball

abstractriceball
This webtext, presented as a DVD interface, discusses the situational contexts of teachers’ assessment practices in student-produced new media texts. Ball discusses a “rhetoric of wow” in approaching the reading of student texts from technorhetorical and poetic lenses while Rice discusses using that rhetorical knowledge to avoid “schmoozery” (i.e., being bamboozled by students’ flashy, but arhetorical, technological prowess). The central discussion of this text focuses on a student-produced video for one of Ball’s classes, with the authors’ arguments about this text (and its rhetorical and pedagogical situating in the field) presented as DVD “extras” in the interface.

accompanying materials

"ix tech comm"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. & Arola, Kristin L. (2005). ix tech comm: visual exercises for technical communication [CD-ROM]. Boston: Bedford–St. Martin’s.

abstract [from CD cover]ix-techcomm
ix tech comm offers a new way to visualize technical communication—because there are things you just can’t do in a book. Each of the 9 exercises moves through the following three steps: (1) Illustrated definitions help students visualize key concepts: text, purpose, element, context, audeince, color, contrast, emphasis, framing, alignment, proximity, organization, and sequence. (2) Guided analyses of real world texts—such as an X-men plane schematic, a bicycling safety PowerPoint presentation, and an illustrated recipe—model for students how to put theory into practice. (3) Interactive assignments invite students to make their own rhetorical choices—changing colors, determining alignment and typeface, and rearranging the elements of a web site’s navigation—and to write about the impact those choices have.

accompanying materials

  • link to CD-ROM’s accompanying website
  • email from teacher who uses ix: tech comm