Tag Archive for online

"Sound in/as Compositional Space" [Video]

citation
Designer/Producer. (2006). Sound in/as compositional space [Video + website]. Computers and Composition Online. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/sound

abstract sound-intro
I designed this website and introductory video for the Sound special issue in C&C Online, which I guest-edited (with Byron Hawk). The video is a 2-minute mash-up/remix of the webtexts contained in the special issue and serves as our “letter from the guest editors” in a multimedia format. (Note: The video is hosted on my server because of space issues on the C&C Online server.)

accompanying materials

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"Dr. Cheryl E. Ball: Tenure & Promotion Portfolio"

citation
Designer/Author. (2006–present). Dr. Cheryl E. Ball: Tenure & Promotion Portfolio. http://www.ceball.com

abstract
This digital portfolio, which uses the WordPress blogging platform as its technological base, has been specifically designed (using an author-modified, open-source WordPress template) to host a living version of my CV for access by my tenure readers, students, and readers in my discipline.

accompanying materials

"Constructing a Tool for Assessing Scholarly Webtexts"

citation
Designer. (2007). For Allison Warner [Author], Constructing a tool for assessing scholarly webtexts. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 12(1).
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.1/binder.html?topoi/warner/index.html

abstract
This webtext presents a tool for assessing the scholarly value of online journal publications. It is part of a larger study that uses Kairos webtexts to investigate the scholarly nature of online texts. The goal of this larger study is to deliver a rubric as an instrument to facilitate the acceptance of online texts within English Studies as evidence of scholarship for professional advancement. In order to understand more fully how an online text can be recognized and valued for its scholarly legitimacy, it is crucial to explore the nature of successful (published) online scholarship. The assessment tool presented in this webtext is comprised of questions that help to reveal commonalities and deviations in the function and value of traditional (print) scholarly conventions toward defining an emerging genre of online scholarship. This webtext is designed using a web browser interface that should be familiar to many web readers. Web browsers enable readers to view web pages and provide a gateway to finding information online. This webtext was intentionally designed to draw attention to the interactive ways in which readers can approach texts that are created in or remediated for the Web. This design is mimetic to my thesis, that scholarly webtexts need both familiar and new assessment tools in order to be valued by academic stakeholders.

accompanying materials

"On a Digital Tenure Portfolio"

citation
Writer/Producer. (2009, March 31). On a Digital Tenure Portfolio [Video]. First presented at 2009 Conference on College Composition and Communication, San Francisco, CA. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJJER7diM6c

abstract
This short movie argues for presenting my tenure materials digitally and outlines the following research questions that are relevant to a digital portfolio and multimodal scholarship:

  • How can tenure guidelines be inclusive of nontraditional scholarship?
  • How can the intellectual labor of nontraditional scholarship be demonstrated?
  • How can tenure readers evaluate nontraditional scholarship?
  • How can universities better disseminate scholarship?

The primary audience for this video is the provost and deans of my college, and I presented it at CCCC to get feedback from my disciplinary audience. (Note: The deans saw it and approved my use of a digital portfolio.) The video is linked to from my tenure portfolio: http://www.ceball.com.

accompanying materials


RAW Website

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. [Designer]. (forthcoming, Winter 2009/10). RAW: Reading and writing new media [Website]. http://rawnewmedia.net.

abstract
This website accompanies the eponymous print book collection being published with Hampton Press and includes digital media materials supplied by the chapter authors.

accompanying materials

"Review of NMEDIAC: The Journal of New Media & Culture"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2002). Review of NMEDIAC: The Journal of New Media & Culture. In Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 7(3).
http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/7.3/binder.html?reviews/ball/index.html

abstract
NMEDIAC: The Journal of New Media and Culture
is an online, peer-reviewed journal housed on the ibiblio server. The site is “a collaboration between the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill’s MetaLab, formerly known as SunSITE, and the Center for the Public Domain” (“about ibiblio“). The premise of NMEDIAC (pronounced inmediacy) is to publish “papers and audiovisual pieces which contextualize encoding/decoding environments and the discourses, ideologies, and human experiences/uses of new media apparatuses.” It is the journal’s intention to approach writing about new media through a “Cultural Studies and ‘critical Internet Studies'” lenses. When the inaugural issue hit the Web, I hoped the journal would fill a gap in scholarly new media studies. It does prove to do so — if in fits and starts — based on the first two issues.

accompanying materials

"States of Digital Scholarship: Review Essay"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (forthcoming, Jan. 2010). States of digital scholarship: Review essay of Scholarship in the digital age by Christine Borgman and Planned obsolescence by Kathleen Fitzpatrick. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 14(2).

abstract
A multimodal review essay of two prominent “books” about digital scholarship, Christine Borgman’s (2007) Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet and Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s online, CommentPress version of her forthcoming book with NYU Press, Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy.

accompanying materials

  • to come

"Best Practices for Online Journal Editors"

citation
Council of Editors of Learned Journals. [Co-author on subcommittee for electronic journal guidelines]. (2008, May). Best Practices for Online Journal Editors. http://www.celj.org/downloads/CELJEjournalEditorsGuidelines.pdf

abstract
The Council of Editors of Learned Journals promotes electronic publishing as a legitimate method of disseminating creative and scholarly work in the humanities. The following compilation—representing the best current advice and practices of CELJ members—is intended to support editors of new and existing online journals in their efforts to produce publications whose value to the academy and to broader intellectual and artistic communities will be recognized. Online publication, for the purposes of these guidelines, includes serial journals and magazines that are specifically designed for digital access and that circulate on the World Wide Web, in library indexes, or in some other digital medium. Fundamentally, editors of online journals should uphold the highest standards of craft and/or scholarly thoroughness, accountability and fairness, as do editors of traditional print journals. However, there are additional dimensions to electronic publishing. The advice that follows takes into account concerns shared by all scholarly journals, regardless of medium, as well as concerns specific to online publication.

accompanying materials

"Designing Collaborative Learning Spaces"

citation
Bemer, Amanda; Moeller, Ryan M.; & Ball, Cheryl E. (2009, September). Designing collaborative learning spaces: Where material culture meets mobile writing processes. Programmatic Perspectives: Journal of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication, 1(2). http://www.cptsc.org/pp/vol1-2/bemer_moeller_ball1-2.pdf

abstract
In May 2007, the Department of English at Utah State University (USU) redesigned its computer lab to increase mobility and collaboration during writing projects. Our study shows that despite the Professional and Technical Communication (PTC) field’s efforts to promote writing as a socially active, collaborative practice, many students view computer labs as spaces for conducting isolated, single-authored work. In this article, we discuss how a combination of movable furniture and mobile technology, including wireless access and laptops, can enhance student collaboration in group-based writing assignments. The lab included both desktop and laptop seating areas, so the authors created a modified worksite analysis designed to evaluate team collaboration in this new layout. These material changes in the lab allow students to configure the space according to their needs, offering them some measure of control over three crucial elements of successful collaboration: formality, presence, and confidentiality.

accompanying materials

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"Digital Scholarship and the New Work of the Book in Composition Studies"

citation
Journet, Debra; Ball, Cheryl E.; & Trauman, Ryan. (in progress). Digital scholarship and the new work of the book in composition studies. In Debra Journet, Cheryl E. Ball, & Ryan Trauman (Eds.) The new work of composing. Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press. http://ccdigitalpress.org

status

  • Update 07/09: Prospectus with introduction submitted to CCDP.
  • Update 10/09: Verbal confirmation from press editor that collection has been accepted.
  • Update 11/09: Email confirmation from press that collection should proceed.

abstract
This introductory chapter to the digital media collection, The New Work of Composing, asks what constitutes a “book” in age of digital scholarship? In a period of digital production, we are pushed to consider what a book is and what it does. How do modes and media change not only how knowledge is produced but also what kind of knowledge is made possible? Which assumptions about the print book—its scope or range, its intellectual possibilities, the kinds of interactions it fosters—are transferable to digital books and which are not? This project lays the groundwork for these questions. The New Work of Composing contains 14 multimodal chapters that are organized around five clusters of issues of related to digital composition. In the introduction, each chapter is described, and the book’s interface is also discussed (e.g., how to read this book).

accompanying materials

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