Tag Archive for open-access

"Digital Scholarship and the New Work of the Book in Composition Studies"

citation
Journet, Debra; Ball, Cheryl E.; & Trauman, Ryan. (in progress). Digital scholarship and the new work of the book in composition studies. In Debra Journet, Cheryl E. Ball, & Ryan Trauman (Eds.) The new work of composing. Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press. http://ccdigitalpress.org

status

  • Update 07/09: Prospectus with introduction submitted to CCDP.
  • Update 10/09: Verbal confirmation from press editor that collection has been accepted.
  • Update 11/09: Email confirmation from press that collection should proceed.

abstract
This introductory chapter to the digital media collection, The New Work of Composing, asks what constitutes a “book” in age of digital scholarship? In a period of digital production, we are pushed to consider what a book is and what it does. How do modes and media change not only how knowledge is produced but also what kind of knowledge is made possible? Which assumptions about the print book—its scope or range, its intellectual possibilities, the kinds of interactions it fosters—are transferable to digital books and which are not? This project lays the groundwork for these questions. The New Work of Composing contains 14 multimodal chapters that are organized around five clusters of issues of related to digital composition. In the introduction, each chapter is described, and the book’s interface is also discussed (e.g., how to read this book).

accompanying materials

see also

"Toward a Reading Heuristic for New Media Texts"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (under review). Toward a reading heuristic for new media texts. Writing spaces: Readings on writings. http://writingspaces.org/

abstract
Using terms familiar to composition, rhetoric, and their related disciplines (i.e., purpose, organization, emphasis, etc.), readers can shift their use of these concepts from written communication to interpret new media texts. I provide a reading of a new media text, “Murmuring Insects” (Ankerson, 2001) to show this transferability in reading new media. The reading and subsequent heuristic that this chapter offers pays attention to the many contexts in which new media texts are produced and read and focuses on interpreting the design elements of a text in relation to its purpose.

status

  • 4/15/09: Chapter proposal submitted
  • 5/20/09: Chapter proposal accepted
  • 7/15/09: Publication contract received & signed
  • 8/15/09: Chapter submitted to editors
  • 1/10: Expected publication date

accompanying materials

Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy

title/status

  • Editor, 2008-present
  • Co-Editor, 2006-2008 (with Beth L. Hewett)
  • Section Co-Editor (CoverWeb, with Beth L. Hewett), 2001-2006

description
Kairos,
which began publishing online in 1996, is an internationally recognized, peer-reviewed journal in digital writing studies. It has a readership of over 45,000 readers a month from over 180 countries and an acceptance rate of 10 percent. The journal publishes three sections of full-length scholarship (Topoi, Praxis, Inventio) and three professional development sections (Reviews, Interviews, Disputatio), which are editorially reviewed by their respective section editors. Issues are openly available on the Web at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net, and are published twice a year, in August and January, with special sections occasionally occurring as a third issue in May. In December 2008, Kairos was recognized by the Council of Editors of Learned Journals for its redesign (the journal’s third look in 13 years), which garnered the CELJ Best Design Award.

small-logoKairos has a longstanding reputation for theoretical and technological innovation, collaborative authorship, editorial mentoring and outreach, and collaborative review processes, all of which support the unique scope and practices of the journal: publishing digital media scholarship that incorporates web-based media to make meaning. The majority of the scholarship Kairos publishes cannot be printed because these web-based articles (i.e., “webtexts”) use interactivity, multiple media including video and audio, and other nonlinear elements to make their scholarly arguments.

see also

"The New Work of Composing"

citation
Journet, Debra; Ball, Cheryl E.; & Trauman, Ryan. (Eds.). (in press). The new work of composing [Digital book]. Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press. http://ccdigitalpress.org

nwc-coverabstract
This “book-length” collection entitled The New Work of Composing examines the complex and semiotically rich challenges and opportunities posed by new modes of composing, new forms of rhetoric, new concepts of texts and textuality, and new ways of making meaning. In particular, this multimodal, digital book will explore how digital media are shaping our understanding of scholarly projects within composition studies. In so doing, it will address the need to re-think what constitutes the “book” in an era of “born digital” scholarship.

status

accompanying materials

"Political Economy and Sustaining the Unstable"

citation
Moeller, Ryan; Cargile Cook, Kelli; & Ball, Cheryl. (2009). Political economy and sustaining the unstable: New faculty and research in English studies. In Danielle DeVoss, Heidi McKee, & Dickie Selfe (Eds.), Technological ecologies and sustainability: Methods, modes, and assessment. Computers and Composition Digital Press/Utah State University Press.  http://ccdigitalpress.org/tes/01_moeller_ball_cargile_cook.pdf

abstract
In this chapter, we present political economy analysis (PEA) as a methodology for understanding and working within the often-shifting techno-ecologies of an academic department. As a case study, we document the shift in an English department at a Carnegie Research University (High Research Activity) in the western United States brought about by the hiring of two junior faculty members with specializations in new media and technology. PEA methods allow us to focus on the material conditions that prompted the new hires (i.e., a new Ph.D. program in the Theory and Practice of Professional Communication) and those brought about by their arrival tes-toc(e.g., changes in new faculty startup packages, the necessity of funded research to the sustainability of the entire department, and renewed pedagogical and economic attention paid to the department’s computer labs). After we discuss PEA, we present a series of interwoven narratives that analyze and consider our experiences through the PEA lens. We conclude with a list of recommendations—for job candidates, hiring committees, faculty, and administrators—that will help departments, we hope, better anticipate, support, and sustain the work of new technology specialist hires.

accompanying materials

Special Issue: Manifestos!

citation
DeWitt, Scott Lloyd, & Ball, Cheryl E. (2008, May). Manifestos! [Special issue]. Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, 12(3).  http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/12.3/

abstract
Wrought with connotation, politically and emotionally charged, manifestos call us to action and demand change—in the streets, in the workplace, in our classrooms, in our minds, and in the virtual spaces we inhabit. Put the manifesto in a mediated space that typically features scholarly work, and it provokes different change-actions. The form of a manifesto seeks sizeable response and has the ability to move an argument quickly to the forefront of a conversation (and keep it there). The manifesto’s typical dense state and its sometimes confrontational approach make it easily susceptible to critique yet can quickly facilitate invention for new scholarly conversations and directions. If our scholarship seems too cutting-edge, too in-your-face, despite its having been deeply considered, then it is reserved for discussing around conference-hotel bars, on listservs and blogs, or over dinner and wine in the backyard patio. We don’t often make the leap to publishing it in scholarly journals. Why? Because these ideas often don’t take the shape of traditional scholarship—even with respect to the different traditions of scholarship in a journal like Kairos. The Manifesto Issue is our answer to these questions.

accompanying materials

"Who needs YouTube?!"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. [Producer/Director]. (2007, Dec. 11). Who needs YouTube?! Presented at The Normal Theater, Normal, IL.

description
I produced an end-of-semester showcase for students in my Multimedia Writing Workshop (English 289.22), which was held at the historic Normal Theater. The showcase included a selection of short digital videos in a variety of genres (video poems, music videos, documentaries, memoirs, motifs, etc.) that the students had produced, and a 3-minute introduction I created to contextualize the range of texts. The introduction video, produced using a Mission: Impossible theme, includes original and found (student) footage and was composed using Audacity, Quicktime Pro, iMovie HD, and Final Cut Pro.

accompanying materials

  • Video intro to “Who needs YouTube?!” [Quicktime movie; compressed version]
  • Full 1-hour compilation available upon request.

"Converging the ASS[umptions] between U and ME"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Moeller, Ryan M. (2008). Converging the ASS[umptions] between U and ME; or, How new media can bridge a scholarly/creative split in English studies. Computers and Composition Online [Special issue: Media convergence]. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/convergence/

abstractconverging
Authors of new media texts regularly draw on both scholarly and creative genres to construct their arguments. In so doing, they bridge disciplinary boundaries that have split English departments in the past. These boundaries are discussed in our text using the following binaries: high :: low, literature :: composition, and popular :: academic discourse. In this article, we examine, then complicate, the binary form :: content through a popular and academic YouTube video (Wesch, 2007). We then situate new media texts within the historical split between rhetoric and literature using Berlin’s social epistemic rhetoric as a bridge. Our argument concludes by showing that new media texts can provide a convergence between binaries in English studies, particularly the one found in tenure guidelines suggesting that research is either scholarly or creative. New media is both/and.

accompanying materials

"Reinventing the Possibilities"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Moeller, Ryan M. (2007). Reinventing the possibilities: Academic literacy and new media. Fibreculture Journal, 10. http://journal.fibreculture.org/issue10/ball_moeller/index.html

abstractfibreculture
This webtext demonstrates the possibilities of using new media to teach students critical literacy skills applicable to the 21st century. It is a manifesto for what we think writing scholars should be teaching in general-education “writing” classes like first-year composition. In order to answer the question of what we should teach, we have to ask what kinds of academic literacy, if any, we value. We argue here that rhetorical theory is a productive way to theorize how meaning is made among new media texts, their designers, and their readers. We use the Ancient Greek concepts of topoi and commonplace to explain how designers and readers enter into a space of negotiated meaning-making when converging upon new media texts. That negotiated space offers a new-media space for learning critical literacies by means other than research papers. As examples, we discuss two student texts and the literacies they demonstrate.

accompanying materials

"From 'They Call me Doctor?!' to Tenure"

citation
Arola, Kristin L., & Ball, Cheryl E. (2007, Spring). A conversation: From ‘They call me doctor?!’ to tenure. Computers and Composition Online. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/doctor

abstractdoctor
This webtext was invited by the editors of the Professional Development section of Computers and Composition Online, and it represents the professional and personal issues that often occur for new faculty members as they transition from being graduate students. The purpose of this webtext is to invite conversation, collaboration, and mentorship between the authors, the collaborators who contributed advice about this transitionary period in academics lives, and by readers of the text.

accompanying materials

award note
This webtext was the Finalist for the 2007 Kairos Best Webtext Award.