Tag Archive for open-access

Data from "Integrating Multimodality"

citation
Anderson, Daniel; Anthony Atkins, Cheryl Ball, Krista Homicz Millar, Cynthia Selfe, Dickie Selfe [Writers], & Matt Bemer [Designer]. (2006). Data from a CCCC research grant survey on teaching multimodal composition. Composition Studies 34(2). http://www.compositionstudies.tcu.edu/archives/342/cccc-data/

abstractcompstudies-data
This website accompanies an article appearing in the print version of Composition Studies entitled “Integrating Multimodality in Composition Curricula: Survey Methodology and Results from a CCCC Research Initiative Grant.” In that article the authors provided methodologies and outcomes of a national survey conducted in 2005 to discover how instructors use multimodal composition practices in their writing classrooms and research. Supported by a research initiative of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the survey was designed to identify instruction in which students and faculty members produce (not just analyze) multimodal texts. The aim of that article is to present a snapshot of instructors working to integrate these new semiotic forms into writing classes. The data in this report includes the questions from and responses to the 141-question survey.

accompanying materials

"Picturing Texts Website"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2004). Picturing Texts [Website]. New York: W.W. Norton.  http://www.picturingtexts.com

abstract [from site]pict-texts-website
Redefining composition to include conscious attention to images and design, Picturing Texts is a writing textbook that teaches how to compose visual texts as well as how to read them. This Web site is a repository of useful materials for working with the book. It includes online readings, with suggested focus and respond sections [coordinating with the structure of the print book]; guidelines for writing for the Web; links to resources on the Web that will help students do the kind of work invited by Picturing Texts; and more.

This website accompanies the writing/composition textbook Picturing Texts (Selfe, Cynthia; Faigley, Lester, George, Diana; & Palchik, Anna; W.W. Norton, 2004). I wrote the content for 7 interactive chapters and 3 sections of ancillary materials for the website.

accompanying materials

see also

"The Rhetoric and Pedagogy of Portable Technologies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2004). The rhetoric and pedagogy of portable technologies [column + graphic]. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 9(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/9.1

description

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

This editorial column introduced four webtexts on wireless technologies, focusing on the rhetoric and pedagogy of wireless labs and writing classrooms, but also on whether these technologies actually help or hinder our teaching.

accompanying materials

"Computers & Writing 2005: New Writing and Computer Technologies"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hewett, Beth L. (2006). Computers & Writing 2005: New writing and computer technologies. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(2). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/10.2/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.htm

description

Issue art designed by Leah Cassorla

Issue art designed by Leah Cassorla

This editorial column focuses on webtexts that originated as presentations at the 2005 Computers and Writing conference. This CoverWeb (themed) section contained six webtexts on a range of topics related to technology and writing studies.

accompanying materials

Special Issue: Sound in/as Compositional Space

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (Eds.). (2006, September). C&C Online [Special issue: Sound in/as compositional space]. http://www.bgsu.edu/cconline/sound

abstract
This special issue addresses the rhetoric of aural and oral modes of communication. The webtexts (interactive online articles) in this collection vary from audio performances exemplifying multimodal mash-up techniques to the rhetorical implications of sound in student-created music videos.

sound-introaccompanying materials

  • table of contents (to read individual webtexts, click on the graphic icons for each)
  • introduction [Quicktime movie; 37 mb — I recommend downloading it to your desktop before viewing. It’ll take several minutes to load.]

"The Intersections of Online Writing Spaces, Rhetorical Theory, and the Composition Classroom"

citation
Cassorla, Leah; Ball, Cheryl E. [Graphic]; & Hewett, Beth L. (2005). The intersections of online writing spaces, rhetorical theory, and the composition classroom. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/10.1/binder2.html?coverweb/bridge.htm

description

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

Issue art designed by Cheryl E. Ball

This CoverWeb (themed section) column introduces four webtexts about online communication. The texts include topics such as teaching digital writing, using templates and wikis in the classroom, and researching place-based blogs.

accompanying materials

"sound+composition+space"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (2006). sound+composition+space [Video]. C&C Online. [Special issue: Sound]. http://ceball.com/other/cconline/sound/intro1.mov

abstractsound
This mash-up of video and audio pieces serves as an introduction to the special issue on sound. Like a traditional “letter from the guest editors,” in which editors contextualize and provide abtracts of the articles in a special issue, this mash-up provides “abstracts” of video and audio that are included in the authors’ texts, thereby contextualizing them by juxtaposing the multiple modes of communication in one text. By splicing samples together (a la the hip hop tradition) from the 14 authors’ pieces, this introduction enacts the performative, aesthetic qualities that the authors articulate are necessary to composition studies in the 21st century. From visual and aural noise at the beginning of the intro, the editors move into an argument for including sound as part of digital writing’s compositional space — that sampling, voiceovers, cut-ups, and other oral/aural considerations can take us into what happens next in writing studies. (Note: Video hosted on my website due to space limitations on C&C Online server.)

accompanying materials

see also

"Reading the Text: A Rhetoric of Wow"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Rice, Rich. (2006). Reading the text: Remediating the text. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 10(2). http://kairos.technorhetoric.net/10.2/binder2.html?coverweb/riceball

abstractriceball
This webtext, presented as a DVD interface, discusses the situational contexts of teachers’ assessment practices in student-produced new media texts. Ball discusses a “rhetoric of wow” in approaching the reading of student texts from technorhetorical and poetic lenses while Rice discusses using that rhetorical knowledge to avoid “schmoozery” (i.e., being bamboozled by students’ flashy, but arhetorical, technological prowess). The central discussion of this text focuses on a student-produced video for one of Ball’s classes, with the authors’ arguments about this text (and its rhetorical and pedagogical situating in the field) presented as DVD “extras” in the interface.

accompanying materials

"Kairos: The Next Ten Years"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., Hewett, Beth L. Eyman, Douglas, & Inman, James. (2006). Kairos: The next ten years. Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, Pedagogy, 11(1). http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/11.1/loggingon

description

Issue art designed by Tracy Bridgeford

Issue art designed by Tracy Bridgeford

The Logging On column in Kairos is equivalent to the editor’s letter in print journals. (This was my first time writing this column after being promoted to Editor.) The column outlines the vision changes that I and my co-editor initiated with the journal (as well as some that the Senior Editors initiated in their new position). Some of those changes include adding new sections that highlight and explain how to read experimental, multimodal scholarship; updating our unique peer-review process (which involves collaboration among 50+ nationally recognized scholars), and more. We also outline the historically focused webtexts published in the anniversary issue.

accompanying materials