Tag Archive for print

"Trans-cultural Multimedia Production in an English Classroom"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2005). Trans-cultural multimedia production in an English classroom. Proceedings for Advancing the Effectiveness and Sustainability of Open Education Conference. Utah State University, Logan, UT.

abstract
In English studies, the past decade has seen a dramatic shift toward analysis and production of multimedia texts (c.f. Cope & Kalantzis, 2000; Wysocki, Selfe, Johnson-Eilola, & Sirc, 2004). This shift is informed by the study of rhetoric, which we defi ne as reading and composing texts with an understanding of a specifi c audience, purpose, and context. In Dr. Ball’s Perspectives on Writing and Rhetoric class, students analyze creative multimodal texts using multiple reading strategies, and then compose their own texts. Although this generation of students is typically well-informed about technology, most of them have never encountered a digital, multimodal text whose purpose is primarily aesthetic. Studying the rhetorical situation in what literary theorists such as Eco and Rosenblatt would call an “open,” readerdriven, adaptable text provides a rich learning experience for students.In this class, students read several examples of open texts including “Murmuring Insects” (Ankerson, 2001), which successfully uses Eastern and Western multimodal elements—including written, aural, visual, animated, and other modes of communication—to juxtapose calm with fear while honoring the events of September 11, 2001. In this presentation, we show this piece in contrast to student-produced multimodal texts that attempt to adopt cultural contexts of other writers, often unsuccessfully. We conclude by suggesting why some students’ attempts at adaptation in these creative and social media are hindered by localized contexts. In addition, we demonstrate how students who don’t attempt to adapt their creative work to other’s contexts often make stronger rhetorical choices in their multimodal texts while still meeting the needs of various audiences.

see also

"Best Practices for Online Journal Editors"

citation
Council of Editors of Learned Journals. [Co-author on subcommittee for electronic journal guidelines]. (2008, May). Best Practices for Online Journal Editors. http://www.celj.org/downloads/CELJEjournalEditorsGuidelines.pdf

abstract
The Council of Editors of Learned Journals promotes electronic publishing as a legitimate method of disseminating creative and scholarly work in the humanities. The following compilation—representing the best current advice and practices of CELJ members—is intended to support editors of new and existing online journals in their efforts to produce publications whose value to the academy and to broader intellectual and artistic communities will be recognized. Online publication, for the purposes of these guidelines, includes serial journals and magazines that are specifically designed for digital access and that circulate on the World Wide Web, in library indexes, or in some other digital medium. Fundamentally, editors of online journals should uphold the highest standards of craft and/or scholarly thoroughness, accountability and fairness, as do editors of traditional print journals. However, there are additional dimensions to electronic publishing. The advice that follows takes into account concerns shared by all scholarly journals, regardless of medium, as well as concerns specific to online publication.

accompanying materials

"Who is the future employer?"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E.; Ferraro, Lora; Rossi, Rebecca; & Schulz, Christina; et al. (16 authors). (2008, August 22). Who is the future employer? New Leadership Board of the Economic Development Council, Bloomington-Normal, IL.

abstract
Since the start of the decade, Bloomington‐Normal has watched neighboring downstate communities, including Decatur and Galesburg, respond to de‐industrialization, unemployment, and heightened anxiety about long‐term employment and quality of life for residents. We have been impacted far less
than these neighbors. However, Bloomington‐Normal residents, employers, and employees—including
this New Leadership Board and the Economic Development Council—must keep an eye on the national
trends affecting our economy, as well as steward a customized plan that maintains existing employers
while also attracting new ones to our region. We’re glad to be part of what promises to be an ongoing conversation within the Bloomington‐Normal
community and offer the EDC this report comprised of the following sections:

  • Current Employers, with a focus on seven critical areas representing primary existing and newly emerging industries/professions.
  • Proposal for Developing Future Employers, with corresponding Advantages and Disadvantages to our proposal.
  • Summary

accompanying materials

"Who's the Boss?: Management Structures"

citation
Johnson, Matt; Ball, Cheryl E.; et al. (13 authors). (2008, November 14). Who’s the boss? New Leadership Board of the Economic Development Council, Bloomington-Normal, IL.

abstract
In “Future of the Workplace,” The New Leadership Board uncovered the quintessence of younger generational workers and its effects on the workforce: what motivates employees, the future employer, and what the future workplace will be. By addressing the conceptual aspects of how and where these generations work, it opens the discussion for more concrete recommendations, specifically, what can be done, and under what structure would they best work. That which motivates or deters an employee will most certainly affect what management structure they perform best within. Therefore, it is imperative that we acknowledge those characteristics to determine the foundation of our recommendations. In Management Structures, we look first to examine the history and nature of current structures. We will propose our insight and opinions as to the most effective model, and present recommendations, both to the EDC, as well as the general business populace, as to what forms of management structure and what other measures will help guide our economy in the future to greater prosperity.

accompanying materials

"Toward a Reading Heuristic for New Media Texts"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (under review). Toward a reading heuristic for new media texts. Writing spaces: Readings on writings. http://writingspaces.org/

abstract
Using terms familiar to composition, rhetoric, and their related disciplines (i.e., purpose, organization, emphasis, etc.), readers can shift their use of these concepts from written communication to interpret new media texts. I provide a reading of a new media text, “Murmuring Insects” (Ankerson, 2001) to show this transferability in reading new media. The reading and subsequent heuristic that this chapter offers pays attention to the many contexts in which new media texts are produced and read and focuses on interpreting the design elements of a text in relation to its purpose.

status

  • 4/15/09: Chapter proposal submitted
  • 5/20/09: Chapter proposal accepted
  • 7/15/09: Publication contract received & signed
  • 8/15/09: Chapter submitted to editors
  • 1/10: Expected publication date

accompanying materials

"On the Rawness of Reading and Writing New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Kalmbach, James. (forthcoming, 2009/10). On the rawness of reading and writing new media: Materialities, histories, and happenstance. In Cheryl E. Ball & James Kalmbach (Eds.) Reading and writing new media (pp. 1–14). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton.

abstractraw-intro
This chapter is the introduction to the edited collection, Reading and Writing New Media. It introduces the concept for the book: a happenstance of theory about new media in digital writing studies suited to the particular moments in time (mid- to late-2000s) in which the book is published.

status

  • see entry for edited collection (linked below)

accompanying materials

see also

"Integrating Multimodality into Composition Curricula"

citation
Atkins, Anthony; Anderson, Daniel; Ball, Cheryl; Homicz Millar, Krista; Selfe, Cynthia; & Selfe, Richard. (2006). Integrating multimodality in composition curricula: Survey methodology and results from a CCCC Research Initiative grant. Composition Studies, 34(2), 59-84.

abstract
This article describes methodology and outcomes of a national survey conducted in 2005 to discover how instructors use multimodal composition practices in their writing classrooms and research. The authors describe the procedures they used to collect and analyze data from writing teachers about the production, distribution, interpretation, and consumption of multimodal composition. Supported by a research initiative of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the survey was designed to identify the instruction occurring at institutions with a nascent or established curriculum of multimodal pedagogy in which students and faculty members produce texts that combine words, images, and sound as composing resources. The aim of this project was to produce a snapshot of those programs working to define multimodal composition and to integrate these new semiotic forms into writing classes.

accompanying materials

see also

"Designerly ≠ Readerly"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E. (2006, November). Designerly ≠ readerly: Re-assessing multimodal and new media rubrics for writing studies. Convergence: The International Journal for Research into New Media Technologies, 12, 393–412. Special issue on re-assessing new media.

abstract
In this article, I draw on Gunther Kress and Theo van Leeuwen’s (2001) Multimodal Discourse: The Modes and Media of Contemporary Communication and Lev Manovich’s (2001) The Language of New Media, which have become prevalent texts in US writing studies fields—a place where multimodal and new media theories have made inroads in the last five years. I briefly describe each of the rubrics the authors used and show how they help readers determine the materialities of multimodal or new media texts. I also argue, however, that writing studies scholars should not rely solely on these rubrics because they function in descriptive ways rather than in interpretive ways for new media texts. In other words, I will show that while a reader could use these rubrics to describe some of the design elements in new media texts, readers cannot use the rubrics to interpret those design elements in ways that would allow them to form a reading of the text. I apply the rubrics to a new media text, “While Chopping Red Peppers” (Ankerson, 2000), to show their limited use and to suggest that while these multimodal and new media theories have a place in writing studies, we need better methods and/or reading heuristics in order to interpret (and teach) such works.

accompanying materials

"RAW: Reading and Writing New Media"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Kalmbach, James. (Eds.). (forthcoming). RAW: Reading and writing new media. Hampton Press: Cresskill, NJ.

abstract
RAW (Reading & Writing) New Media
is an edited collection of contemporary theoretical and pedagogical issues in new media studies. Chapters are written by a range of digital writing studies scholars, from graduate students to full professors. There is an accompanying website to the book.raw-cover

status

  • In progress: Prospectus and four chapters go to MIT Press in November 2006, for consideration. 18 chapters are in final editing stages.
  • Accepted for publication: Book is forthcoming from Hampton Press (Fall/Winter 2009) with 21 chapters.
  • In press/Update 9/12/09: Final proofs have been checked.
  • In press/Update 10/20/09: Index has been completed.

accompanying materials

"Letter from the Guest Editors"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E., & Hawk, Byron. (2006). Letter from the guest editors. Computers and Composition, 23(3), 263–265.

abstract
Because of the rise in multiliteracies scholarship since 1999, and with it a dramatic increase in the kinds of texts students read and compose in writing classrooms, this special issue hopes to introduce readers to a next step in multiliteracies composition. That is, we’ve moved—as a field—from linguistic to visual meaning-making, all in digital environments; so, a logical progression is to include other modes of meaning including audio. In doing so, we hope to provide readers with an overview of how a multiliteracies approach that incorporates attention to audio is possible within composition studies. The seven articles in this issue explore forms of audio from several theoretical, historical, and musical perspectives, adding a breadth and richness to current scholarship that uses sound in compositional practices. The authors discuss a range of sonic genres including opera, hip-hop, rock-n-roll, as well as voiceovers and soundtracks. The timeline of these genres covers centuries, from Wagner to digital multimodality (if not virtual reality, although that’s mentioned along the way). The authors connect their discussion of audio—from sampling, sound effects, professional and amateur recordings, and hypermediation—to composition and knowledge-making methods as diverse as using citation systems and teaching sonic literacies.

accompanying materials