Archive for White Papers

“Building a Better Back-End” – NEH DH white paper

citation

Ball, Cheryl E. (2014). Building a better back-end: Editor, author, and reader tools for scholarly multimedia (Grant #HD-50188-10). Washington, DC: NEH Office of Digital Humanities.

abstract

This white paper outlines the original NEH DH Start-Up Grant activities for “Building a Better Back-End,” which aimed to build PHP plug-ins for Open Journal Systems to allow for multimedia workflows. Ultimately, the project was not successful. The white paper outlines as set of lessons learned from this grant project.

accompanying materials

"Best Practices for Online Journal Editors"

citation
Council of Editors of Learned Journals. [Co-author on subcommittee for electronic journal guidelines]. (2008, May). Best Practices for Online Journal Editors. http://www.celj.org/downloads/CELJEjournalEditorsGuidelines.pdf

abstract
The Council of Editors of Learned Journals promotes electronic publishing as a legitimate method of disseminating creative and scholarly work in the humanities. The following compilation—representing the best current advice and practices of CELJ members—is intended to support editors of new and existing online journals in their efforts to produce publications whose value to the academy and to broader intellectual and artistic communities will be recognized. Online publication, for the purposes of these guidelines, includes serial journals and magazines that are specifically designed for digital access and that circulate on the World Wide Web, in library indexes, or in some other digital medium. Fundamentally, editors of online journals should uphold the highest standards of craft and/or scholarly thoroughness, accountability and fairness, as do editors of traditional print journals. However, there are additional dimensions to electronic publishing. The advice that follows takes into account concerns shared by all scholarly journals, regardless of medium, as well as concerns specific to online publication.

accompanying materials

"Who is the future employer?"

citation
Ball, Cheryl E.; Ferraro, Lora; Rossi, Rebecca; & Schulz, Christina; et al. (16 authors). (2008, August 22). Who is the future employer? New Leadership Board of the Economic Development Council, Bloomington-Normal, IL.

abstract
Since the start of the decade, Bloomington‐Normal has watched neighboring downstate communities, including Decatur and Galesburg, respond to de‐industrialization, unemployment, and heightened anxiety about long‐term employment and quality of life for residents. We have been impacted far less
than these neighbors. However, Bloomington‐Normal residents, employers, and employees—including
this New Leadership Board and the Economic Development Council—must keep an eye on the national
trends affecting our economy, as well as steward a customized plan that maintains existing employers
while also attracting new ones to our region. We’re glad to be part of what promises to be an ongoing conversation within the Bloomington‐Normal
community and offer the EDC this report comprised of the following sections:

  • Current Employers, with a focus on seven critical areas representing primary existing and newly emerging industries/professions.
  • Proposal for Developing Future Employers, with corresponding Advantages and Disadvantages to our proposal.
  • Summary

accompanying materials

"Who's the Boss?: Management Structures"

citation
Johnson, Matt; Ball, Cheryl E.; et al. (13 authors). (2008, November 14). Who’s the boss? New Leadership Board of the Economic Development Council, Bloomington-Normal, IL.

abstract
In “Future of the Workplace,” The New Leadership Board uncovered the quintessence of younger generational workers and its effects on the workforce: what motivates employees, the future employer, and what the future workplace will be. By addressing the conceptual aspects of how and where these generations work, it opens the discussion for more concrete recommendations, specifically, what can be done, and under what structure would they best work. That which motivates or deters an employee will most certainly affect what management structure they perform best within. Therefore, it is imperative that we acknowledge those characteristics to determine the foundation of our recommendations. In Management Structures, we look first to examine the history and nature of current structures. We will propose our insight and opinions as to the most effective model, and present recommendations, both to the EDC, as well as the general business populace, as to what forms of management structure and what other measures will help guide our economy in the future to greater prosperity.

accompanying materials

Data from "Integrating Multimodality"

citation
Anderson, Daniel; Anthony Atkins, Cheryl Ball, Krista Homicz Millar, Cynthia Selfe, Dickie Selfe [Writers], & Matt Bemer [Designer]. (2006). Data from a CCCC research grant survey on teaching multimodal composition. Composition Studies 34(2). http://www.compositionstudies.tcu.edu/archives/342/cccc-data/

abstractcompstudies-data
This website accompanies an article appearing in the print version of Composition Studies entitled “Integrating Multimodality in Composition Curricula: Survey Methodology and Results from a CCCC Research Initiative Grant.” In that article the authors provided methodologies and outcomes of a national survey conducted in 2005 to discover how instructors use multimodal composition practices in their writing classrooms and research. Supported by a research initiative of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, the survey was designed to identify instruction in which students and faculty members produce (not just analyze) multimodal texts. The aim of that article is to present a snapshot of instructors working to integrate these new semiotic forms into writing classes. The data in this report includes the questions from and responses to the 141-question survey.

accompanying materials